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Oxaliplatin Injection

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Mar.01.2024

Oxaliplatin Solution for injection

What is this medication?

OXALIPLATIN (ox AL i PLA tin) treats colorectal cancer. It works by slowing down the growth of cancer cells.

This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

How should I use this medication?

This medication is injected into a vein. It is given by your care team in a hospital or clinic setting.

Talk to your care team about the use of this medication in children. Special care may be needed.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once. NOTE: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medication?

Side effects that you should report to your care team as soon as possible:

  • Allergic reactions—skin rash, itching, hives, swelling of the face, lips, tongue, or throat
  • Bleeding—bloody or black, tar-like stools, vomiting blood or brown material that looks like coffee grounds, red or dark brown urine, small red or purple spots on skin, unusual bruising or bleeding
  • Dry cough, shortness of breath or trouble breathing
  • Heart rhythm changes—fast or irregular heartbeat, dizziness, feeling faint or lightheaded, chest pain, trouble breathing
  • Infection—fever, chills, cough, sore throat, wounds that don't heal, pain or trouble when passing urine, general feeling of discomfort or being unwell
  • Liver injury—right upper belly pain, loss of appetite, nausea, light-colored stool, dark yellow or brown urine, yellowing skin or eyes, unusual weakness or fatigue
  • Low red blood cell level—unusual weakness or fatigue, dizziness, headache, trouble breathing
  • Muscle injury—unusual weakness or fatigue, muscle pain, dark yellow or brown urine, decrease in amount of urine
  • Pain, tingling, or numbness in the hands or feet
  • Sudden and severe headache, confusion, change in vision, seizures, which may be signs of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES)
  • Unusual bruising or bleeding

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your care team if they continue or are bothersome):

  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Pain, redness, or swelling with sores inside the mouth or throat
  • Unusual weakness or fatigue
  • Vomiting
This list may not describe all possible side effects. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Where should I keep my medication?

This medication is given in a hospital or clinic. It will not be stored at home.

NOTE: This sheet is a summary. It may not cover all possible information. If you have questions about this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider.

What should I tell my care team before I take this medication?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • Heart disease
  • History of irregular heartbeat or rhythm
  • Liver disease
  • Low blood cell levels (white cells, red cells, and platelets)
  • Lung or breathing disease, such as asthma
  • Take medications that treat or prevent blood clots
  • Tingling of the fingers, toes, or other nerve disorder
  • An unusual or allergic reaction to oxaliplatin, other medications, foods, dyes, or preservatives
  • If you or your partner are pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • Breast-feeding

What may interact with this medication?

Do not take this medication with any of the following:

  • Cisapride
  • Dronedarone
  • Pimozide
  • Thioridazine

This medication may also interact with the following:

  • Aspirin and aspirin-like medications
  • Certain medications that treat or prevent blood clots, such as warfarin, apixaban, dabigatran, and rivaroxaban
  • Cisplatin
  • Cyclosporine
  • Diuretics
  • Medications for infection, such as acyclovir, adefovir, amphotericin B, bacitracin, cidofovir, foscarnet, ganciclovir, gentamicin, pentamidine, vancomycin
  • NSAIDs, medications for pain and inflammation, such as ibuprofen or naproxen
  • Other medications that cause heart rhythm changes
  • Pamidronate
  • Zoledronic acid
This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care provider a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What if I miss a dose?

Keep appointments for follow-up doses. It is important not to miss a dose. Call your care team if you are unable to keep an appointment.

What should I watch for while using this medication?

Your condition will be monitored carefully while you are receiving this medication.

You may need blood work while taking this medication.

This medication may make you feel generally unwell. This is not uncommon as chemotherapy can affect healthy cells as well as cancer cells. Report any side effects. Continue your course of treatment even though you feel ill unless your care team tells you to stop.

This medication may increase your risk of getting an infection. Call your care team for advice if you get a fever, chills, sore throat, or other symptoms of a cold or flu. Do not treat yourself. Try to avoid being around people who are sick.

Avoid taking medications that contain aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen, naproxen, or ketoprofen unless instructed by your care team. These medications may hide a fever.

Be careful brushing or flossing your teeth or using a toothpick because you may get an infection or bleed more easily. If you have any dental work done, tell your dentist you are receiving this medication.

This medication can make you more sensitive to cold. Do not drink cold drinks or use ice. Cover exposed skin before coming in contact with cold temperatures or cold objects. When out in cold weather wear warm clothing and cover your mouth and nose to warm the air that goes into your lungs. Tell your care team if you get sensitive to the cold.

Talk to your care team if you or your partner are pregnant or think either of you might be pregnant. This medication can cause serious birth defects if taken during pregnancy and for 9 months after the last dose. A negative pregnancy test is required before starting this medication. A reliable form of contraception is recommended while taking this medication and for 9 months after the last dose. Talk to your care team about effective forms of contraception. Do not father a child while taking this medication and for 6 months after the last dose. Use a condom while having sex during this time period.

Do not breastfeed while taking this medication and for 3 months after the last dose.

This medication may cause infertility. Talk to your care team if you are concerned about your fertility.

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